Hoodia Gordonii

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Hoodia Gordonii

Hoodia gordonii is a leafless spiny succulent plant with medicinal properties. It grows naturally in South Africa and Namibia. The flowers smell like rotten meat and are pollinated mainly by flies. The indigenous San people (Bushmen) of the Namib desert call this plant ǁhoba(pronounced [kǁʰɔbɑ] - the initial sound is a lateral click) - and the Afrikaans Ghaap.

Hoodia gordonii supplements  was discovered and painted by col. Robert Jacob Gordon in the vicinity of the Orange River in about 1779, and identified as a Stapelia, a closely related genus.

The use of Hoodia spp. has long been known by the indigenous peoplesof Southern Africa, who infrequently use these plants for treatingindigestion and small infections, but their use of the plant to suppress appetite on long hunting trips in the Kalahari Desert has stimulated the most interest.

In 1977, the South African Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR) isolated the ingredient in hoodia—now known as P57—which is responsible for its appetite control effect, and patented it in 1996. The CSIR then granted United Kingdom-based Phytopharm a license, and they collaborated with the pharmaceutical company Pfizer to isolate active ingredients from the extracts and look into synthesizing them for use as appetite control supplements.  Pfizer released the rights to the primary ingredient in 2002. Paul Hutson, associate professor in the University of Wisconsin–Madison School of Pharmacy, told the Wisconsin State Journal, "For Pfizer to release something dealing with obesity suggests to me that they felt there was no merit to its oral use". Shop for hoodia gordonii supplements online today.